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Enat Ethiopian Restaurant

50% off Enat Ethiopian Restaurant
With fresh injera made in-house and spices imported from Ethiopia, Enat is traditional and authentic, especially their silverware: "your God-given hands," as the menu says. All the better to gobble down that kei wott with.
Give me a roll of injera bread and a big platter covered in spicy collards, lentils, and doro wat, and I'm apt to eat until I collapse face-first onto the mosob. After all, any cuisine that can turn something like cabbage, which normally doesn't exactly induce any excitement, into a spicy and complex dish is a winner in my book. And few rep that cuisine so proudly as Enat, a little Ethiopian joint on Cheshire Bridge that has spent the past eight years introducing Atlantans to the recipes that have been passed down through generations for the past 3,000 years. With fresh injera made in-house, spices imported direct from Ethiopia, and a small, cozy interior decked out in Ethiopian accoutrements and woven mosob tables, Enat is traditional and authentic, especially their silverware: "your God-given hands," as the menu says. All the better to gobble down that kei wott with. (But if you'd rather start off with a fork, knife, table and chair, Marta's got your back. It's a learning curve.)

I continue to be amazed at the way Ethiopian cooking can take something so seemingly mundane, like lentils or peas or collards, and with a little berbere and some kitchen magic, upgrade them into flavorful, delicious dishes. Well, I suppose it isn't just magic—the cooks at Enat know their stuff, and can spice, braise, stew, and sautee their ingredients with the best of 'em, resulting in some serious flavor (and delightfully pungent aromas as soon as you walk inside the restaurant). The veggie dishes, which are Enat's specialty, are tangy and spicy, miles beyond the limp collards and mushy peas of my childhood. And even if it's your first injera rodeo, you'll never feel like a total newb, thanks to Marta and her welcoming, genuinely friendly staff. They do their best to make you feel at home, even when you're fumbling around with your injera and spilling your tibs all over your shirt (or maybe that was just me). In fact, that's exactly why Marta opened the little restaurant in the first place—to give people the same open door policy and warm hospitality that she knew so well back home. After sipping a cup of hot shai tea, chatting about the secrets in the berbere sauce, and taking pointers from her on my injera skills, I felt like Enat's done a pretty swell job of that.



Menu Highlights:
Kei Wott (Spicy Beef Stew), $12
Chicken Doro Wot, $12
Beef Kitfo, $10
Misser Wott (Lentils), $8
Gomen Wot (Collards), $8
Yesom Beyaynetu (Veggie Combo), $12

Hours:
Lunch:
Monday - Saturday, 11:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.
Dinner:
Monday - Saturday, 5 p.m. - 10 p.m.
Sunday, 4 p.m. - 10 p.m.

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