This week is a very special one for us over at Scoutmob and we thought we'd share it with you. So, we're extending an invitation to our very first New York Mob Hit. Need more information? Just read on and all your questions will be answered and all your dreams come true. Well, we can't guarantee that second part. But we can say it should be good time. Oh, and here are a couple other things, too, if that's not enough to quench your thirst for fun:

WE DON’T WANT TO MISS:

SCOUTMOB NY'S VERY FIRST MOB HIT
Tuesday, September 21, 6 p.m.
You've been collecting Scoutmob coup's for weeks and we're doubtful that you've used them all already. So, in case you still have the one to The Counting Room in Williamsburg, join us as we decend upon the wine bar/cocktail louge/Nutella S'more-serving station and cash in on our discount. All the NYC Scouts will be there, so even if you've already used the deal, come on by and introduce yourself—we're long overdue for meeting our fans (a.k.a. Scoutmob Mobsters).
scoutmob.com

ALSO WORTH CHECKING OUT:

CAN STUYVESANT TOWN BE SAVED FOR AFFORDABLE HOUSING?
Wednesday, September 22, 6:30 p.m.
Stuy town was originally built as a low-income housing development. A few years ago, it was sold and has been marketed as an upscale apartment and condo option in the East Village. Regardless of what side you're on, this change is affecting the landscape of NYC, not to mention available affordable housing, which certainly concern us all. Rafael Cestero, commissioner of the New York City Department of Housing Preservation and Development, will lead a panel discussion to explore how the fate of Stuy Town affects overall NYC affordable housing.
mcny.org

LIGHT READING
Monday, September 20 – Thursday, September 23, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Continuing her "Digital Book Project," artist Airan Kang shows her first solo exhibition at the Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery. This time, instead of creating light shows in bookstores, reading rooms and libraries (which is what she's been up to for the last 10 years), she's creating actual light books. Using LED (pictured) mechanisms, she's taking pieces of classic literature and creating light-driven neon replicas of the originals. Whether you can sit there and read the whole book, however, is yet to be determined.
brycewolkowitz.com