With the inception of television, film and our personal favorite, GifTV, we don’t find ourselves going to the theater as often as we once did. This is a dang shame because whenever we do go, we have an awesome time and thing, “What a dang shame. We should go to the theater more often.” You can already see, or read rather, being stuck in such a horrible circle is the quickest way to dig a rut. Do not want. And so, we’ve made it a priority, a mid-September resolution, as it were, to get out more. See some shows that don’t transmit through a flat-screen television. Plus, we’ve heard DC’s theater scene is the cat’s pajamas. Seriously, this cat’s pajamas are awesome.

Of the more than 70 (that's right, SEVENTY!) theater companies in the DC area, our personal favorite is Arlington’s Synetic. Run by Georgian nationals (the country, not the state), they did a phenomenal job turning Mikhail Bulgakov’s The Master and Margarita into a sensory overload of the best kind. Dance, contortionists, creative use of props. It was the one production we’ve seen that captured the true essence of this Russian masterpiece of magical realism.

But much like Lamar Burton’s take on books, you don’t need to take our word for it, take that of DCist and Washingtonian theater guru, Missy Frederick (also, a food reporter for Washington Business Journal), who let us in on her tips to get more people off the couch and into the sturdier chairs of a local theater.

SCOUT: What is it with everyone thinking theater is so inaccessible these days? It’s like if no one’s getting voted off an island, it seems too brainy. Please tell us we’re wrong…
MISSY: I think once people see a show or two, they realize that theater isn't inherently more difficult or challenging than any type of art form, whether it be a movie, a television show, etc. Some people seem to find musicals more accessible, and a lot of theaters around town do a great job with them, including Signature Theatre in Arlington and, more recently, Arena Stage with shows like "Oklahoma!"

SCOUT: See, that’s the kiss of death sometimes when you bring up theater – musicals. Haters often gonna hate…
MISSY: Some people just don't like musicals, period. For them, there are other approaches to take. Research a play that tackles a subject matter you find appealing - did you know Woolly Mammoth Theater hosts shows like a one man version of "Lord of the Rings"?

SCOUT: Uh, no I did not know that…
MISSY: And if avante garde or abstract theater freaks you out, look for a company that produces more mainstream work. Arena Stage specializes in American authors, which some might find appealing. Studio Theater often performs shows that were recently hits on Broadway, which is another way of vetting your choices. Or if you remember enough Shakespeare from high school to get through one of his classics, there are several theaters around town which specifically specialize in the Bard's works – Shakespeare Theater Company, Washington Avant Bard (formerly Washington Shakespeare Company), Folger Shakespeare Library…

SCOUT: Finally, what about the cost. Watching some freaky parents moms ruin their daughters’ lives in Dance Moms is absolutely free. I have to pay cash money to go to the theater…
MISSY: There are ways to get around that, too. Services like Goldstar offer tickets at half price or steep discounts. Some companies offer cheap tickets for younger audience members. And other smaller companies like Taffety Punk offer cool shows at cheap prices, sometimes as low as $10.

That's cheaper than it costs to get a ticket to see Shark Night 3D. Which means there's officially no excuse now. See you in the mezzanine.